Health Services Administration

Taxonomy

Code

D006298

Scope note(s)

  • The organization and administration of health services dedicated to the delivery of health care.

Source note(s)

  • Medical Subject Headings

Display note(s)

Hierarchical terms

Health Services Administration

Equivalent terms

Health Services Administration

  • UF Administration, Health Services

Associated terms

Health Services Administration

38 Archival description results for Health Services Administration

Administrative records

The records here pertain to both the School of Nursing and the Nursing Service until the closing of the School in 1971. Records dated after 1971 refer to the School only.

Arpad G. Gerster private practice patient records

  • US AA005
  • Collection
  • 1881-1923

This collection contains the private practice records of Dr. Arpad G. C. Gerster. They span almost his entire career as a surgeon in New York City, from 1881-1923. These records are contained in three bound volumes and five boxes. The patient cards were received in three wooden boxes.
The volumes, which were personalized for Dr. Gerster, contain chronological patient records from January 1, 1881 to July 24, 1906. Each patient record has pre-printed slots for the following information: date, age, name and dwelling, business and nativity, diagnosis, treatment, and remarks. Dr. Gerster completed these categories. However, he often had little or nothing to say under 'remarks' and sometimes did not include 'age.' 'Business' was included less often in later years. Presumably, comments under 'treatment' were not completed when not necessary.
The first volume is entirely in German (except for Latin diagnoses). Some of the early entries in the second volume are in English, and by 1892 they are primarily in English. In the front of each volume is an alphabetical index to patients' case records. The last entry in the third volume is on July 24, 1906.
There is a three year gap between the bound volumes of patient records and the first case in the file boxes, which commences on July 26, 1909. Here, cases numbered from 1 - 442 were recorded on pre-printed cards. Some additional questions are included on these cards. These include: civil state, family history, personal history, previous diseases, date of operation, operator, assistant, anesthetist, anaesthetic, amount and examination of urine (chart to be filled in). On the reverse side are pre-printed anatomical drawings for further notations. These forms were clearly meant for use with patients expecting a surgical procedure. However, these cards were often not completed as many patients did not require surgery. Beginning with case number 444 (January 1911) Dr. Gerster ran out of the pre-printed forms and used plain paper to record his patient information. These records reflect the same information as that on the preprinted cards, however they are more difficult to read.
The patient records reflect a private practice of the time. Although Dr. Gerster functioned as a general physician, his practice revealed a bias towards surgically treatable patients. At this time, it would have been difficult to have an exclusively surgical practice because there would not have been enough business to support it. However, because of Dr. Gerster's abilities and prominence, he came as close as possible to having such a practice. Over the span of the records, the types of cases did not show any significant shift in character. The cases have a great deal of variety. Included among the many diagnoses were rheumatoid arthritis, alcoholic hepatitis, acute nephritis, chronic gastritis, double cleft palate, eczema, inguinal hernia, syphilis, vulva cutis, pulmonary tuberculosis, arteriosclerosis, uterine hemorrhage, and many others.
There are a variety of inserts and attachments found throughout the patient records. These include sketches by Dr. Gerster illustrating ailments and abnormalities of patients; correspondence from physicians introducing patients (a number of these are from out of state and many are not in English); pathology lab reports from both the German Hospital and Mount Sinai regarding excised tissue; correspondence from patients; and two radiographic images. (These images are located in: Case Book Number 3, April 17, 1901, and Card File Box 1, in front of Case 104.)
Private patient records such as these are probably uncommon in hospital archives since they do not directly relate to hospital practice. These records are especially interesting because they occur during a period when surgery became safer and more common and when the rise and dominance of surgery as a method of treatment was seen. Additionally, they are of interest because they are the records of Dr. Gerster, an influential and prominent surgeon during his time.
Dr. Gerster's notes end with case number 3670 on February 23, 1923. The patient records continue to October 27, 1923. An unidentified physician apparently took over Gerster's practice shortly before his (Gerster's) death on March 11, 1923.

Gerster, Arpad G. (Arpad Geyza), 1848-1923

Center for Excellence in Youth Education records

This collection includes the records of the Center for Excellence in Youth Education (CEYE) under the direction of Lloyd Sherman, Ed. D. CEYE records following Dr. Sherman's death in 2012 are part of the separate Center for Multicultural and Community Affairs series. The collection is arranged in three series: Alphabetical files, Curriculum files, and Grants files. It includes Secondary Education Through Health (SETH) and SHOP program material; summer research programs for high school and college students; Young Scientists Day (1989) program and flyer with Keith Haring artwork; grant and curriculum files.

Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Center for Excellence in Youth Education

Clinical Excellence Committee records

These files represent an almost complete official record of the Clinical Excellence Committee, the Task Forces, and their subcommittees. The minutes are complete, with only one exception. There are few interim reports or correspondence among the coordinators, the chairmen of the committees, and members. The final report is contained in Box 2, folder 1.

Some of the minutes have notes made by Dr. Thomas Chalmers, President and Dean of The Mount Sinai Medical Center and School of Medicine. The files probably came from that office, although, aside from these few notes, they are generic.

Mount Sinai Medical Center (New York, N.Y.). Clinical Excellence Committee

Department of Public Relations records

This series includes the records of the Office of Public Relations up to 1966 when Beryl Reubens was hired. There are records from when the following people were in charge of the function: Roman Slobodin (1942-44), Edith Behrens (1944), Leon Jacobson (19?-1962), Shel Sukoff (1962-?) and Jan Tyroler (1964-65).

There are many interesting aspects to this collection, including how it demonstrates the role of the Trustees in the life of the Hospital as well as how the functions of publicity and fund raising were handled. Initially combined, these two duties were separated in 1967 when the first full-time Director of Development was hired. Other strengths are the light the papers shed on the Hospital during World War II, and how the Hospital described itself through its publications and press activities. There are interesting glimpses of important Mount Sinai scientists as the Public Relations Office interviewed and researched them for their press efforts.

Mount Sinai Hospital (New York, N.Y.). Department of Public Relations

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