Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

Taxonomy

Code

D000163

Scope note(s)

  • An acquired defect of cellular immunity associated with infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a CD4-positive T-lymphocyte count under 200 cells/microliter or less than 14% of total lymphocytes, and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and malignant neoplasms. Clinical manifestations also include emaciation (wasting) and dementia. These elements reflect criteria for AIDS as defined by the CDC in 1993.An acquired defect of cellular immunity associated with infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a CD4-positive T-lymphocyte count under 200 cells/microliter or less than 14% of total lymphocytes, and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and malignant neoplasms. Clinical manifestations also include emaciation (wasting) and dementia. These elements reflect criteria for AIDS as defined by the CDC in 1993.

Source note(s)

  • Medical Subject Headings

Display note(s)

Hierarchical terms

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

Equivalent terms

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

  • UF Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome
  • UF Acquired Immuno-Deficiency Syndrome
  • UF AIDS
  • UF Immunodeficiency Syndrome, Acquired
  • UF Immunologic Deficiency Syndrome, Acquired

Associated terms

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

12 Archival description results for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome

12 results directly related Exclude narrower terms

Interview with Gerard M. Turino, MD by Norma M.T. Braun, MD

The interview topics include Dr. Turino’s childhood, college and medical school years, and the research he did after medical school (Class of 1948), in particular, his Korean War service working at the National Research Council where his team created Dextran, a substitute for plasma. He describes his fellowship experiences that started in a cardiopulmonary laboratory, to focus on cardio function, but led to studying lung function. Significant mentions include a fellowship with the NY Heart Association, and his time as an investigator for the City of New York. A collaboration with Ines Mandl, PhD, whose special interest is the elastic tissue of the body, led to investigating mechanisms of lung injury, and this lead to studying alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, and desmosine and isodesmosine as biomarkers in COPD.

Dr. Turino relates how he established the James P. Mara Center for Lung Disease, how he became the first John H. Keating Professor of Medicine at the St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center (SLR), and his efforts to make SLR a top tier research hospital. He discusses several of the outstanding researchers he recruited to SLR, and his work with several professional organizations. Of particular interest are his accounts of fund raising with American Lung Association and his involvement with the start of promoting asthma research, as well as his current clinical trials with the hyaluronan as a potential therapy for alpha-1 antitrypsin patients.

He touches on family life, wife and children, and their directions in life early in the interview and his recreational choices later in the conversation. Dr. Braun asks his opinion on the merger of St. Luke’s and Roosevelt Hospitals, and his vision for the future of medical science.

Significant names or topics mentioned in the interview include: Dr. André Frédéric Cournand; Dr. Dickinson W. Richard; Alfred Fishman; Karl Meyer, MD, PhD; Ines Mandl, PhD; James P. Mara Center for Lung Disease; Jahar Bhattacharya MD, DPhil; Alan Rozanski, MD; David J. Volsky, PhD; Seymour Lieberman; Yong Y. Lin, PhD; AIDS/HIV; American Thoracic Society; Shuren Ma, PhD; hyaluronan; hyaluronic acid; Jerome Cantor; Matrix Therapeutics; Medical Science Institute; Dr. Arthur J. Antenucci.

Turino, Gerard M.

Interview with Judith Axelrod, MD by Norma M.T. Braun, MD

Judith L. Axelrod, MD is on the staff of the Division of Infectious Diseases of Department of Medicine at St. Luke’s Hospital. She speaks about her early influences, her training, professional relationships, her experience as a woman working in medicine in the 1970s through the 2000s, and how her work meshed with her family life. Dr. Axelrod also discusses the beginnings of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. During her interview, Dr. Axelrod speaks about Donna Mildvan, MD, Arthur Ashe, John Hutchinson, MD, Solomon A. Berson, MD, Theodore B. VanItallie, MD, Michael H. Grieco, MD., Jeanne Baer, MD, Airlie Cameron, MD, and Sami A. Hashim, MD.

Axelrod, Judith

President of the Medical Center, John W. Rowe, MD records

This collection of papers from Dr. Rowe’s office is different from previous Presidents’ collections, providing a higher level view of Mount Sinai. There are very few files relating to the various departments of the Medical School or the Hospital as is seen in earlier President’s files. There is also little here relating to the Hospital’s establishment of the Mount Sinai Health System, although the merger with New York University is covered. This is undoubtedly due to the fact that Dr. Rowe served as President of the Mount Sinai Medical Center only. Earlier Presidents had also been Dean of the School of Medicine and so had oversight over these departmental or institution specific issues.

There is a great wealth of material regarding Mount Sinai’s efforts vis-à-vis other institutions. This includes proposed initiatives with Columbia University, the affiliation with the City’s Queens Hospital Center and the years of controversy over privatization of the Queens’ municipal hospitals, and the School of Medicine’s affiliation contracts with Elmhurst and Queens Hospitals. There are also files relating to the Department of Geriatrics and the development of creating ties with businesses and Keio University in Japan.

The merger with New York University is documented by two distinct series of files that were received and processed separately. The “MS-NYU Initiative” files (boxes 24-25) cover the initial proposal, development and implementation of the merger. The “NYU” files (boxes 27-28) document Dr. Rowe’s service as President of the combined Mount Sinai-NYU Health following the merger and include departmental correspondence, real estate / building records, and an extensive collection of material related to the NYU Downtown Hospital.

Mount Sinai’s real estate holdings and physical facilities are documented by an extensive subject file on buildings (BLD, boxes 4-6), and its financial activities by a finance series (FIN, boxes 13-14) and an extensive series on fundraising (FND, boxes 15-20.) There is a small amount of material related to Mount Sinai School of Medicine (box 26), primarily covering commencements, convocations and honorary degrees.

Also of importance are the extensive files on the search for a new Dean in 1996/97, the many files charting Mount Sinai’s efforts to deal with the rise of AIDS in New York, and the files on establishing the Office of Technology Transfer and its later efforts, a matter of great importance to institutions in the late 20th, early 21st century.

Mount Sinai Medical Center (New York, N.Y.). Office of the President